Breastmilk: why it’s good for babies

Breastmilk: why it’s good for babies

Breastmilk is often referred to as the natural food for babies, and for good reason. Breastmilk has been evolving for millions of years to meet the changing nutritional needs of babies as they grow and develop. While formula manufacturers attempt to create a similar product, they cannot replicate the exact composition and benefits of breastmilk.

Breastmilk is a complete food source for babies for the first 6 months of their lives, providing all the nutrients they need to grow and develop without the need for solids, water, or other liquids. Breastmilk is also easily digestible, making it easy for babies to absorb the nutrients.

Breastmilk: why it’s good for babies

 

The benefits of breastmilk go beyond just providing nutrition. The colostrum in breastmilk, which is the first milk produced by the mother after giving birth, is packed with antibodies and other beneficial substances that help boost the baby's immune system and support their growth and development. Breastmilk has been shown to reduce the risk of various infections and conditions, including gastroenteritis, respiratory tract infections, ear infections, type-1 diabetes and type-2 diabetes, obesity, and some cancers. The fats in breastmilk are also essential for brain development.

Breastfeeding is not only beneficial for babies, but also for mothers. Breastfeeding is free and convenient, and can help some women lose weight after giving birth (but definitely not all). Breastfeeding mothers tend to have an easier time getting back to sleep compared to formula-feeding mothers, and also have lower rates of breast and ovarian cancer, osteoporosis, type-2 diabetes, and high blood pressure.

Breastmilk: why it’s good for babies

 

It's important to note that breastfeeding is a learned skill and may require patience and support to master. Women and their partners can seek guidance and support from midwives, child and family health nurses, lactation consultants, and the Australian Breastfeeding Association. If a woman decides not to breastfeed, infant formulas can provide adequate nutrition for babies.

It is recommended that babies be breastfed exclusively for the first 6 months of life, after which solids and water can be introduced. Breastmilk should continue to be the main source of nutrition for babies until at least 12 months of age, and breastfeeding can continue beyond 12 months if desired by the mother and child.

 

Breastmilk: why it’s good for babies

 

Breastfeeding provides not only vital nutrients for the growth and development of babies, but also fosters a deep emotional connection between mother and child. As a baby latches on and suckles, the mother's body releases oxytocin, a hormone affectionately known as the "love hormone." This surge of oxytocin facilitates bonding, enhances maternal instincts, and reduces anxiety, helping both mother and baby feel calm and secure in their relationship. Additionally, breastfeeding allows for skin-to-skin contact and close physical proximity, further reinforcing this emotional bond. Through breastfeeding, a mother's nurturing presence provides the baby with a sense of safety and trust, creating a strong foundation for their psychological well-being and future relationships.

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